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 The Market Theatre and Café Tribute - Part 2
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The Market Theatre and Café Tribute (continued...)

3rd Ear’s Market Café - Afrika Poster 1977 - Front CDR 3eM 900 A B Sleeve
002A Photo 01B and Caption – 3rd Ear’s Market Café Logo designed by Brenda Bishop 1977
3rd Ear’s Market Café - Afrika Poster 1977 - Front CDR 3eM 900 A B Sleeve
002A Photo 01B and Caption – 3rd Ear’s Market Café Logo designed by Brenda Bishop 1977

MARKET THEATRE CAFÉ (The KUIF) 1976 – 1978 – Pat Schwartz notes:
®© AD DONKER 1988

The second entertainment venue in the complex to open was the Market Cafe; minute, eccentric, airless and much loved by those who frequented it. Run by innovative musician/composer Dave Marks and his wife Fran, the Cafe somehow epitomized much of what the Market complex was striving to be. It was, says Manim, 'a strange and wonderful activity,' where Marks played 'Pied Piper to all the folksy musos of the day'. In July 1976 the first note in the Cafe was sounded by Michael Dickman on a wooden flute and signalled an (all too short) era of warm music and warm vibes.

The presence of Dave Marks at The Market was, somehow, fated to be. As early as 1973 he had pinpointed the building as a wonderfully theatrical place. (It was Ben Segal, 3rd Ear Music founder who first identified the Market and then) applied to the City Council to use it for a folk music festival. They turned down the proposal. Later, he ran his New Troubadour folk club in a corner bar of the Oxford Hotel while The Company occupied the Blue Fox. So, when The Market did indeed become an entertainment complex, it was a natural place for him to take his music and his ideas.

3rd Ear’s Market Café - Sipho Mchunu & Johnny Clegg –7th May 1978 - Photo David Marks
3rd Ear’s Market Café - Sipho Mchunu & Johnny Clegg –7th May 1978 - Photo David Marks
Working with the help of one regular assistant and a band of actors Marks altered, painted, created the space he wanted. A week before the Cafe was due to open on July 18, it was flooded when the municipal water pipes burst. Still, it opened on schedule and, at the official opening on August 1, Allen Kwela headed the bill. 'My idea was always to have a venue which would serve the interests of the entertainers; I thought there was so much energy around,' says Marks. The intention was to follow an overseas trend and exploit the connection between contemporary music and theatre, to work for a synthesis of theatre, music and technology and put on shows rather than simply have people get up on the stage and sing. Marks even installed a small recording studio in the Cafe, offering every artist who worked there a chance immortality under the label of his publishing and sound company, 3rd Ear Music.
3rd Ear’s Market Theatre Café Creator – 3rd Ear Music’s David Marks 1976
3rd Ear’s Market Theatre Café Creator – 3rd Ear Music’s David Marks 1976
He believes that South Africa’s audio boom had its origins in The Market. It provided a central point where people involved with sound could come and test equipment and experiment with miking systems. ‘We were able as a small publishing and sound company to consolidate and people would look over our shoulders. I believe the seed of the technical synthesis of acoustics with a theatre and trying to project an actor or musician was sown in the Cafe,' Marks saw the Cafe as a nursery in which the bud of a truly South African music could be nurtured. Already the country's artists were being cut off from the American and European mainstream and, quite correctly, he forecast that the isolation would increase.
Market Café - Ray Dorset & Mungo Jerry visit on the way through South Africa from Zimbabwe in 1977 – David, Fran, Lisha, Ray and Band Market Café after the pipe burst flood. Every floor-tile had to be relayed by the musician’s hands.
Market Café - Ray Dorset & Mungo Jerry visit on the way through South Africa from Zimbabwe in 1977 – David, Fran, Lisha, Ray and Band Market Café after the pipe burst flood. Every floor-tile had to be relayed by the musician’s hands.
Thanks to The Market's non-racial policy, Cafe audiences had the chance to hear artists like Juluka and Malombo well before they hit the headlines and the pop circuits. Dollar Brand (now Abdullah Ibrahim) agreed to do a gig because the Cafe did not serve alcohol. Rod McKuen and George Hamilton IV made their appearances on the little stage. Everything, from the sandwiches to the set ups, was done by actors and musicians. Actresses Vanessa Cooke and Beverly Melnick, musician Fran Marks made and served the sandwiches - slaving over hot stoves instead of hot stages. 'It didn't do much for the Western perception of what stars were all about,' observes Marks. But the food served at the Cafe lives on as vividly in the memories of actors and Market Theatre staff as does the music and the wonderful atmosphere. They recall with great nostalgia Fran Marks' large and delicious sandwiches sold at ridiculously non-profitable prices and her banana milkshakes, reputed to be the best in the country.
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Zakes Mofekeng, Pat Matshikiza and Tommy Masemola with young Flutist - Rehearsing for Black is The Colour at Dorkay House 1976 3rd Ear’s Market Café – Jimi Hendrix Tribute - Band of Gypsies 1977 Program designed by Brenda Bishop The Band of Gypsies 1977 Father, 2 sons and a cuzin – from the deep south the Pulvenis Family Band have been together since 1956
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Zakes Mofekeng, Pat Matshikiza and Tommy Masemola with young Flutist - Rehearsing for Black is The Colour at Dorkay House 1976 3rd Ear’s Market Café – Jimi Hendrix Tribute - Band of Gypsies 1977 Program designed by Brenda Bishop The Band of Gypsies 1977 Father, 2 sons and a cuzin – from the deep south the Pulvenis Family Band have been together since 1956
There were other attractions as well. On four television screens mounted around the room music videos - then almost totally unknown in South Africa - were screened. (South Africa did not have Television until 1977) Late night audiences, usually comprising actors, could see the work of David Bowie, Bob Marley, Bob Dylan.

Like everywhere else at The Market at the time there was idealism, energy in the Cafe that made innovation almost inevitable. Shows grew out of ideas tossed around by actors and musicians who happened to have free time (and no income; the Cafe shows never made a fortune but most of them were well attended and the small turnover sometimes covered costs & meals) 'Let's do something' was the theme. No one person can claim the credit for the shows that grew up in the Cafe says Marks. 'The synthesis of the venue, the actors and the musicians 'allowed it to happen. The great reward is that there are people whose careers started there.' And out of the work at the Café the book In Township Tonight (by Prof. David Coplan) and the film Rhythm of Resistance (Virgin Records) took shape.

3rd Ear's Market Café - Dr David Coplan (USA – In Township Tonight) with Gabriel Mabi Tobejane & Dr Malombo – Philip Tabane 1977
3rd Ear's Market Café - Dr David Coplan (USA – In Township Tonight) with Gabriel Mabi Tobejane & Dr Malombo – Philip Tabane 1977
It was hard, though. 'We lived from hand to mouth and we had no financial support from the Foundation,' Marks recalls. 'We had to go out and work during the day to make the Cafe work at night. But we were just grateful to have the venue.' Particularly important in the life of the Cafe, says Marks, Was photographer Rod Barnett who 'played a very big role in terms of encouragement and keeping us going'. Barnett, who has maintained a close involvement with The Company which began when during a stint as a street photographer, 'I went past "Boesman and Lena" and I thought what's all this and that's how I got involved' was a stalwart of those early days in a variety of ways.
His were the earliest photographs taken as the building changed from market to theatre (unfortunately many of them have mysteriously vanished). It was at his home that members of The Company found refuge and relaxation on Sundays - swimming and playing volleyball and often eating their only healthy meal of the week, provided by his wife Pat.
Market Cafe Colin Shamley Shades of Lenny Bruce 1976
Market Cafe Colin Shamley Shades of Lenny Bruce 1976
It was at his house. Too, that Ron Smerczak fell on Vanessa Cooke as he partnered her during a volleyball game resulting in her rehearsing The Seagull with a leg in plaster. Barnett’s generosity provided the (fruit) blender that made the Café’s famous banana milkshakes (Fran’s recipe) and often cash when the Café it was in dire straits.

Johannesburg was simply not ready for the departure from traditional club fare. When it thought club it thought elegant nightclubs and the brash American-style discotheques, which abounded at the time.

Today there are several ‘alternative’ clubs in the city run in much the same way as Marks envisaged the Café. He was sadly before his time.

Editor’s note: David based the Market Theatre Café – or KUIF as it was most often referred too – on his experiences with the Folk & Jazz coffee bars of the 60’s, most notably The Troubadour in Doornfontein and the NiteBeat in Hillbrow.

3rd Ear’s Market Café Early Poster – Colin Shamley, Malombo and Late Night Allen Kwela - 1976
3rd Ear’s Market Café Early Poster – Colin Shamley, Malombo and Late Night Allen Kwela - 1976
Having started the Sunday evening Folk ‘n Rock crossover club, The Totum, in Durban in 1970, (for Daily News Journalist Robert Wilson – initiator & patron of ‘alternative‘music venues) he returned to Johannesburg and while working at Dorkay House for Barney Simon and Ian Bernhardt (Union Artists & Phoenix Players), he set about approaching various empty spaces in Hillbrow (in hotels mainly), searching for a 3rd Ear Music home. 1973 Marks produced the 8th National Folk Festival (The Country Comes to Town) in Peter Prowess’s Blue Fox Theatre at the Oxford Hotel in Baker Street, Rosebank. The Blue Fox Theatre wasn’t doing too well , so David offered to take it over and stage Folk music events.
Gabriel ‘Mabi’ Tobejane of Malombo Market Café 1976 (Rodney Barnett RIP)
Gabriel ‘Mabi’ Tobejane of Malombo Market Café 1976 (Rodney Barnett RIP)
The Country Comes to Town (which followed the controversial 1972 National Folk Festival that 3rd Ear Music and SAFMA produced on a farm in Rivonia) got Barney interested, not only in the venue, but also in the Folk Musicians and Singer Songwriters who performed in the Blue Fox and in the New Troubadour – the corner pub of the Oxford in Baker Street. In 1974 Barney and Mannie took over the Blue Box from David with The Company and another Folk / Rock Music and Theatre collaboration began. However the notorious ‘liquor laws‘ were making it difficult for mixed events and audiences. David had been discussing the idea of another ‘coffee bar’ type Theatre with the late Stan Domp who owned a popular music instrument shop at 260 Louis Botha Ave in Orange Grove. The Village Theatre was born and Barney and Mannie moved in with a Company production. This was the start of a successful music / theatre collaboration between Barney and John Oakley-Smith.
3rd Ear’s Market Café 1976 - John Oakley-Smith Conducting Label HY 3eD 643a - Photo Rodney Barnett (RIP)
3rd Ear’s Market Café 1976 - John Oakley-Smith Conducting Label HY 3eD 643a - Photo Rodney Barnett (RIP)
(Pat Schwartz continues): Still, a number of shows started life in that tiny (Market Café) space and went on to the larger stages in the complex. One, the intriguingly named Boogie Woogie, Bubble and Squeak, the creation of Leonie Hofmeyr, Michele Maxwell and Sara McNair, a talented trio calling themselves 'Skirted Issue', went on to tour not only in South Africa but abroad too.
Happenings in the Cafe included revues created around the work of Bob Dylan and Jimmy Hendrix - the latter performed by a band called 'Gypsies' (a family band, father, sons & a cousin formally known as the Sassons that were formed in Johannesburg’s Southern Suburbs 1958 changing their name after being turned on by Jimi Hendrix in 1966 – and still rocking in 2004) whose tenancy is remembered as distinctly colourful and flavored by the presence of their own particular brand of groupy-concerts illustrated with slides; spontaneous evenings of entertainment for aficionados and anyone else who happened in. Like Gary Zulberg (Market Foundation) for whom the attraction was less the music than the presence of an old (5 Iron 1950’s) pinball machine.
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Sipho Sepamla (RIP) One of the first Poets to recite in the Market Café relaxing at the Market in 2004 – Phot David Marks
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Sipho Sepamla (RIP) One of the first Poets to recite in the Market Café relaxing at the Market in 2004 – Phot David Marks
Financial problems killed the Cafe. For some reason, recalls Mannie Manim, 'it all faded out'. On July 16, 1978, almost two years to the day after it started, Marks was told the venture was not carrying its weight financially.
The Café was to be replaced by an entirely different though equally eccentric & creative place.

In August 1978 The Laager came to Johannesburg and on September 21 the first new resident – PIETER-DIRK UYS / EVITA BEZUIDENHOUT & company , moved in.

HY 3eD 900A CDR 1

SECTION 1 – Township Rap ‘n Jive 70’s Style – 1977 / 1978

3rd Ear’s Market Café – Aaron Big Voice Jake Lerole (RIP) – Photo Sketch by David Marks
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Aaron Big Voice Jake Lerole (RIP) – Photo Sketch by David Marks

Tracks 1 & 5 (1a & 1e) Notes: Township variety Sun 16 May 1978 featured: THE ROCK, BIG VOICE JAKE LEROLE & KID TLETLE, SHOSHANGUVA DOLLS, SUE MATTISON, ANNA NKOSI, AMA BHUBESI - Technical note; the Market Cafe only held 70 people but we could get 100 sardined into the place; the hassle with the recorded sound was the inevitable "inverse" mix; if the musicians were too soft (vocals, kick drum) or too loud (guitars, bass) then the opposite effect would be imprinted on tape. Recorded: David Marks Live Sound to ReVox A77 16th May 1978 - 7.5ips Reel 39 HDD 888Track 1 (01a) Time 4’ 12” Big Voice Jake Aaron Lerole & Kid Tletle – Untitled
(Composer: Aaron Lerole)
(Publishers - Gallo or EMI Music – Copyright Control SAMRO 1976)
Track 5 (01e) Time 3’ 55” Shoshanguva Dolls with The Rock – Untitled Tune
(Composer: Aaron Lerole)
(Publishers – Gallo / Copyright Control SAMRO)
Tracks 2 to 4 (01b to 01d) SURVIVAL CAST from Workshop ’71 Market 1977
Not too certain where / when this was recorded - but it may have been in the MARKET CAFE in 1976. David and / or Don may have done it in the big theatre. Check David’s Journals from 1975 to 1977 – 15ips Reel Number: HDD 884 (Marat / Sade) 914
 
Track 2 (01b) Time 1’ 25” Survival Cast - Albert Street
Track 3 (01c) Time 1’ 29” Survival Cast – Soweto
Track 4 (01d) Time 1’ 43” Survival Cast - Skhomba' eduze
(Composers: Survival Cast / Traditional)
(Publisher: Copyright Control)

SECTION 2 – African Township Jazz – 12 Nov 1977

3rd Ear’s Market Café – Malombo Mabi Tobejane and Philip Tabane 1956 Photo by David Marks
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Malombo Mabi Tobejane and Philip Tabane 1956 Photo by David Marks
Track 6 (2a) DR. PHILIP TABANE Guitar & Vox\
GABRIEL 'MABI' TOBEJANE Venda African Drums Percussion;
Not sure who the Flute player was - Tommy Masemelo or ?
Recordings direct from PA Mix David Marks ReVox A77 7.5ips 12” Reel HDD 919 / 65
Track 6 (2b) Time 3’ 24” Malombo – Untitled
(Composers: Philip Tabane)
(Publishers – Malombo Music 1975 SAMRO)
SECTION 3 – Maskandi Cross Over – Rural to Suburban Market Cafe 16 Jan 1977

3rd Ear’s Market Café – Sipho Mchunu and Johnny Clegg by David Marks 1976
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Sipho Mchunu and Johnny Clegg by David Marks 1976
Tracks 7 to 10 (03a to 03e) Johnny Clegg & Sipho Mchunu MARKET CAFE last show of their 2nd run - 16th Jan 1977 Great show to a 'mixed' audience - nice guitar sounds and separation; JC explains / introduces the stories behind the songs JOHNNY CLEGG - Guitar, uMphe Bow & Vocals; SIPHO MCUNU - Guitar, Concertina & Vox. Recorded 7.5ips 12” Reel Tape HDD 921 direct from PA Mix by David Marks to ReVox A77 from Raindirk Mixer (borrowed) from Dennis Feldman (MSC Hillbrow).

Track 7 (03a) Time 8’ 05” Johnny & Sipho - Inkunzi Ayi Hlabi Ngokusima
(Composers: Trad / Clegg / Mchunu)
(Publishers – Look South Music)
Track 8 (03b) Time 2’ 34” Johnny & Sipho – Mangoba
(Composers: Trad / Clegg / Mchunu)
(Publishers – Look South Music)
Track 9 (03c) Time 7’ 48” Johnny & Sipho - Mother Beats Boy
(Composers: Trad / Clegg / Mchunu)
(Publishers – Look South Music)
Track 10 (03d) Time 8’ 43” Johnny & Sipho - Stick Fight –
(Composers: Trad)
(Publishers – Look South Music)
Track 11 (03e) Time 0’ 40” David Marks announces forthcoming attractions

SECTION 4 – Suburban Singer Songwriters Folk ‘n Country Rock Market Cafe Aug 1976

Paul Clingman 1976 by John Massey-Taylor
Paul Clingman 1976 by John Massey-Taylor
Track 12 to 14 (04a to 04c) The Market Cafe provided one of the only visible (and audible?) platforms for SAfrican (English & Afrikaans) singer- Songwriters & rockers from the mid 70’s until 3rd Ear Music’s Chelsea Theatre Underground and the Le Chaim in Hillbrow opened in 1980 (closed in 1982). Later the Dawson’s (1983) and The Jameson (1984 to approx. 1989) opened. Point is, there were no commercial outlets for experimental music – Township Jazz, Maskandi, Marabi, Funk, Rock, Folk etc – and no record or broadcast (Radio or TV) would feature these musicians. South Africa was going through its worst ever political oppression and state violence, so any messing about with the status-quo, insofar as contemporary music was concerned, was simply ignored or, if it threatened to become popular (Roger Lucey, Colin Shamley, Paul Clingman, John Oakley- Smith etc) then it would be silenced (See Foot Soldier for Apartheid by Paul Erasmus >>) We recorded over 100 Market performances, but include herewith previously unheard songs & outakes
Colin Shamley with parts of the old Boot 1976 – Dougie Batterson and Trevor
Colin Shamley with parts of the old Boot 1976 – Dougie Batterson and Trevor
Track 12 (04a) Time 3’ 28” Colin Shamley – Night Sounds
(Composer: Colin Shamley)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music SAMRO)
Recorded August 1976 onto Cassette from PA mix (NEEDS digital cleaning – badly compressed)
Track 13 (04b) Time 4’ 50” Colin Shamley - Too Little Love
(Composer: Colin Shamley)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music SAMRO)

COLIN SHAMLEY - Vox & Guitar / BARRY LANGTON – Bass / LES KEMSLEY - Drums
Technical Notes: Recorded August 1976 direct from PA mix to ReVox A-77 / 1 - NORM in sections / 2 - Paragraphic L & then R / 3 - ECHO in
sections L & then R / NOISE REDUCTION from grabs

Track 14 (04c) Time 3’ 55” Paul Clingman & Johnny Clegg - Mining Town
(Composer: Paul Clingman)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music SAMRO)
Paul Clingman Vocals and Guitar / Johnny Clegg Harmonies and Guitar

SECTION 5 – Free Form Jazz - Market Cafe 21 Sept 1976

Abdullah Ibrahim (Dollar Brand) Mixing by David Marks
Abdullah Ibrahim (Dollar Brand) Mixing by David Marks
Track 15 (05) Abdullah Ibrahim (known then as Dollar Brand) appeared at Wits on 21 Sept 1976 - David Marks (3rd Ear Sound) mixed the show & invited Dollar (Abdullah) to the Market after the Wits show & recorded this piece (on VERY bad tape) as a memento of the visit. Recorded PA Mix David Marks ReVox A77 Reel 7.5ips – HDD 928 Market Cafe - 21 Sept 1976 edited from a 25 min piece.

Track 15 (05) Time 3’ 10” Dollar Brand / Abdullah Ibrahim – Part 5 of one long song (25 Minutes)
(Composer: Ibrahim)
(Publisher – Unknown SAMRO)

HY 3eD 900B CDR 2

SECTION 1 – Suburban Singer Songwriter Folk (Cont) - Market Cafe 1976 - 1977

3rd Ear’s Market Café - John Oakley-Smith - Photo Frank Black - The Star
3rd Ear’s Market Café - John Oakley-Smith - Photo Frank Black - The Star
Track 1a to 1c Note: John Oakley-Smith was and is considered one of the very best English African singer songwriters. His songs remain firmly hidden for reasons that only the South African Music media, record, broadcast and entertainment industries would be aware of – because there is no way that songs & performances by John (in Clubs, Concerts and through so many Theatre productions) could have escaped, unheard in the mainstream, locally & international, without a conscious effort to prevent him from doing so. His is one of the strangest pre-1990 Hidden Years SAfrican music stories ever untold; which we are certain the HYMAProject will eventually uncover. 30 years later and people who attended his performances can still remember the tunes, the song stories and the occasions of the events – despite most of his songs never being made available on tape. He recorded 12 tunes for Warner Bros. Records in 1976.
3rd Ear’s Market Café – John Oakley-Smith Terri and Boris 1976 – Photo David Marks
3rd Ear’s Market Café – John Oakley-Smith Terri and Boris 1976 – Photo David Marks
Track 1 (01a) Time 3’ 53” John Oakley-Smith – Rough & Tumble Days
(Composers: John Oakley-Smith & Barney Simon)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music / Riff Raff Music SAMRO)
Co-composed with Barney Simon in 1974 (for a Company Theatre Production at The Village, 260 Louis Botha Ave Orange Grove Johannesburg) John Oakley-Smith - Vox Piano
Track 2 (01b) Time 1’ 57” John Oakley-Smith – House Lights - 1976
(Composer: John Oakley-Smith)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music / Riff Raff Music SAMRO)
Track 3 (01c) Time 5’ 02” John Oakley-Smith Wax Museum & Intro Market Cafe 1976
(Composer: John Oakley-Smith)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music / Riff Raff Music SAMRO)

John Oakley Smith Vox, Guitar and Piano 2 Week run at the Market Theatre Cafe / Kuif to Launch Matinees on Saturdays (Warner Bros WBC 8000); Nino Rivera – Slides, Rodney Barnett (RIP) Photos and Publicity - A 3rd Ear Music Presentation Live desk recordings by David Marks direct to ReVox A77. Copied to PC from Reel Tape HDD

SECTION 2 – Foreign Country Folk ‘n Blues - Market Cafe 1976 – 1977

3rd Ear’s Market Café – Flibbertigibbet - David Williams Assie Williams O’Donnel Jo Dudding Barrie Glen Photo by Tony Campbell
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Flibbertigibbet - David Williams Assie Williams O’Donnel Jo Dudding Barrie Glen Photo by Tony Campbell
Tracks 4 & 5 (2a – 2b) Flibbertigibbet - popular SAfrican Irish music band, recorded by Anton Den Tueling & David Marks & produced by David for 3rd Ear Music & issued on 3rd Ear's Stanyan Africa Label in 1977. It wasn’t until 1997 that this album was issued on CD by Kissing Spell Records in the UK and in Asia and sold extremely well. Back in 1976 when the recordings were made, with no airtime (as was usual for all 3rd Ear Music musicians) only 200 copies were sold.

Assie Williams & Jo Dudding - Vocals, Boran, Percussion; David Williams - Guitar,
Vocals & Mandolin; Barrie Glen - Guitar, Vocals & Perc; Dave Lambert - Violin; Denny Lalouette – Bass

Track 4 (02a) Time 1’ 28” Flibbertigibbet - Blackleg Miner - Market Cafe 1977
(Composer: Traditional Irish)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music SAMRO)
Track 5 (02b) Time 2’ 42” Flibbertigibbet - Whistling Jigs To The Moon
(Composer: Dave Williams)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music SAMRO)
3rd Ear’s Market Café - Silver Creek Mountain Band from East London Promo sketch 1976 by Obie Oberholzer
3rd Ear’s Market Café - Silver Creek Mountain Band from East London Promo sketch 1976 by Obie Oberholzer
Tracks 6 & 7 (2c – 2d) Silver Creek Mountain Band - MARKET CAFE 10 June 1977 - Blue Grass & Cajun Music disciples in Africa This was one of a few Market appearances; Silver Creek is still going after some 35 years (2006) - although the personnel have changed often: This was the original band that came from a real Silver Creek in East London: ROD DRY - Double Bass; DENNIS SCHULTZ - Vocals & Guitar; DAVE 'PLOD' TARR (RIP) - Fiddle; ROGER CUMMINGS (RIP) - Mandolin, Banjo, Piano Accordion, Guitar and Violin – Recorded by David Marks direct from PA Mix – Raindirk (borrowed) from Dennis Feldman (MSC Hillbrow). 7.5ips 12” Reel Tape HDD 924
Track 6 (02c) Time 2’ 57” Silver Creek Mountain Band – Sarie Marais
(Composer: Trad / CC)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music SAMRO)
Track 7 (02d) Time 2’ 57” Silver Creek Mountain Band – Cowboys Sing The Blues
(Composer: Bob Wills)
(Publisher – Copyright Control SAMRO)
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Edi Niederlander
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Edi Niederlander
Track 8 (02e) Edi Niederlander - Vox & Guitar – Edi came to prominence as an acoustic ‘folk ‘n blues’ guitarist in the mid 60’s Johannesburg Coffee Bars and Folk Festivals. She switched to electric guitar and songwriting in the 1970’s and has featured in many bands since. Edi has recorded several albums for Mountain Records in Capetown, where she now lives.

Edi appears regularly in shows & bands. She has been teaching selected students guitar for over 40 years. Tape drop-out & noise - Copied from 10” Reel HDD 421 18 Nov 2003 – Direct

PA to ReVox Recording by Don Williamson (RIP) & Jurgen Zahringer (3rd Ear Music)

Track 8 (02e) Time 3’ 11” Edi Niederlander - 900 Miles
(Composer: Trad) (Publisher – Copyright Control SAMRO)

3rd Ear’s Market Café - Brian Finch & Mike Dickman in 1971 Photo by Dennis Skouse
3rd Ear’s Market Café - Brian Finch & Mike Dickman in 1971 Photo by Dennis Skouse
Track 9 (02f) MIKE DICKMAN featured prominently in many coffee bars, festivals & clubs throughout the 60’s & early 70’s – a Legendary influence for over 3 decades on SAfrican acoustic guitar players who followed – he was (& remains) a master guitar player. Now living and teaching in Paris, France. Roger Lucey had just hitched from Durban to JB for the first series of gigs since 3rd Ear's Mangles in Braamfontein with a bunch of new songs - He had been a waiter (and living with Fran & David Marks in Hillbrow) when he Pestered David for a slot at the Market Cafe; so we let him open for Mike Dickman on the 9th July 1978 - the rest as they say in his Story Recording direct to ReVox by Ben Segal
Track 9 (02f) Time 3’ 54” Mike Dickman - Silkie
(Composer: Mike Dickman)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music SAMRO)
SECTION 3 – Revolting SAfrican Rock Legends - Market Cafe 1976 – 1977

3rd Ear’s Market Café – Chief Radio Rat Dr Johanthan Handley formally of 3rd Ave Springs and Editor of The Palladium in 1976
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Chief Radio Rat Dr Johanthan Handley formally of 3rd Ave Springs and Editor of The Palladium in 1976
Track 10 (03a) Radio Rats - Revolting revolutionary New Wave band for the times from Springs. The Market was their first gig outside of Springs and the Market Café club appearance led to a contract with Joburg Records, Patrick van Blerk
Track 10 (03a) Time 5’ 59” The Radio Rats - Mucking About in the Dungeons all Day
(Composer: Jonathan Handley)
(Publisher – Radium Wreckords SAMRO)

Jonathan Handley - Vocals & Guitar
Dave Davies - Vocals
Lloyd Ross - Bass & Guitar
Herbie Parkin - Bass
Julian Platt – Drums
Recorded by David Marks direct from PA Mix, Market Café HDD

3rd Ear’s Market Café – Raven in Flight from Pretoria 1977
3rd Ear’s Market Café – Raven in Flight from Pretoria 1977
Tracks 11 & 12 (03b) Raven fronted by Bassist PIET BOTHA - the prelude to JACK HAMER; DINO SALVATORI - Vox; PIET BOTHA - Bass; DOC BARENDSE - Guitar; GABY LE ROUX - Keyboards; DEREK RILEY – Drums Recorded by David Marks direct from PA Mix

Track 11 (03b) Time 4’ 40” RAVEN – Don’t Tell Us
(Composer: Piet Botha)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music SAMRO)

SECTION 4 – Afro Funk Jazz - Market Cafe 1977
Spirits Rejoice in 3rd Ear Music’s Market Cafe Concert with Poets 1976 - Photo Tony Campbell
Spirits Rejoice in 3rd Ear Music’s Market Cafe Concert with Poets 1976 - Photo Tony Campbell
Tracks 12 & 13 (04a) Spirits Rejoice - Oct 1977 Last Show for the Café - Spirits Rejoice part of 2 week stint that included poetry. MARKET CAFE desk mix. RUSSELL HERMAN - Electric Guitar & Vox; MERVYN AFRICA - Keyboards & Vibes; SIPHO GUMEDE - Bass; GILBERT MATHEWS - Drums; DUKE MAKASI - Tenor & Soprano Saxes; GEORGE TYEFUMANI - Trumpet; TEMBA MEHLOMAKULU - Trumpet & Trombone. This was a year (to the month) after DAVID MARKS had produced AFRICAN SPACES for Atlantic (WEA) Records (ATH 4010) Recorded by David direct from PA Mix, Market Café 17th Oct 1977 HDD 920 / 927

Track 12 (04a) 15’ 35” Spirits Rejoice amaKaya - Market Cafe 17th Oct 1977
(Composer: Sipho Gumede)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music / Marimba Music SAMRO)
Track 13 (04b) Time 10’ 22” Spirits Rejoice – Woza Xhosa - Market Cafe 17th Oct 1977
(Composer: Mervyn Africa)
(Publisher – 3rd Ear Music / Marimba Music SAMRO)

...back to the first part >>

(p)© David Marks

3rd Ear Music Company est. 1969 (Pty)Ltd.

P.O.Box 50633
Musgrave 4062
Durban
KwaZulu-Natal
South Africa
email: thirdear@iafrica.com


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